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Paper Details

Spinal versus General Anesthesia for Elective Cesarean Section: Immediate outcome  

Tarik Saber Sarhan   1; Adel Al-Hady Ahmed Diab2; Mohamed Ibrahim Abdel-aal 3 1Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Damietta Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Egypt; Emergency Medical Service and Critical Care, Inaya Medical College, Saudi Arabia. 2Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Damietta Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Egypt 3Department of Pediatrics, Damietta Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Egypt  

Journal Title:International Journal of Medical Arts
Abstract


Background: Recent interest has focused on the influence of obstetric anesthesia types on the immediate neonatal and maternal outcome. Aim of the work: The study was intended to assess the immediate neonatal and maternal outcome in relation to the maternal anesthesia type during cesarean section. Patients and methods: the present study included 200 full term neonates whose mothers underwent elective cesarean section (CS). They were grouped according to type of anesthesia given to mothers into group 1: included 100 newborns whose mothers had general anesthesia and group 2: included 100 newborns whose mothers had spinal anesthesia. Each newborn evaluated for short-term outcome including Apgar score, need for NICU admission and blood gas analysis. Mothers assessed for postoperative outcome. Results: No significant differences were discovered between the types of anesthesia used in regard to the general maternal characteristics. Neonatal outcomes on the other hand showed no significant differences as regard Apgar score (P=0.33) and NICU admission (P= 0.57), PaCO2, HCO3, Na and K; while PH and PaO2 were significantly lower with spinal anesthesia (P= 0.02 and 0.008 respectively). Additionally, spinal anesthesia was associated with rapid recovery of bowel and less need for postoperative analgesia. Conclusion: The type of anesthesia used in mothers undergoing full term elective cesarean deliveries does not seem to affect the immediate neonatal outcome. Both may be safely used in full term elective cesarean deliveries. However, spinal anesthesia had the advantage of lower need for postoperative analgesia with rapid recovery of bowel  

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